Category Archives: Movie Review

  • 0

Movie Review – Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl

Category : Movie Review

Director: Gore Verbinski

Starring: Johnny Depp, Keira Knightley, Orlando Bloom

Year: 2003

The Curse of the Black Pearl is one of the best movies of all time.  I say this with a small asterisk, since in this case I mean ‘movie’ very specifically and I use it far differently than the word ‘film’.  The Royal Tenenbaums is my favorite film, Braveheart is my favorite movie; I distinguish them as the former being the best piece of cinematic art I have ever seen and the latter being the most perfectly wrapped package of entertainment I have ever had the joy to rip open.  This way of thinking allows me to be both critic and audience, judging features on their merits but also on my level of enjoyment.  Black Pearl is most definitely an enjoyable bit of theatrics, a smartly made blockbuster that utilizes every trick in the book to flash magic in the eyes of the audience and leave us clapping in glee.  I don’t mind that from time to time, and I particularly respect it when it’s done well.

The Caribbean during British colonial occupation was a place of paradise, piracy, and plunder.  Lawless men looked to take advantage on the high seas, while Her Majesty’s navy chased them around ever spit of land.  One of the most infamous pirates of that age was the clever Captain Jack Sparrow, a trickster as much as a killer, a man who couldn’t be caught.  Except, as our story begins, he is indeed caught, after rescuing the lovely Elizabeth Swann from drowning and outdueling the young blacksmith Will Turner.  However, an attack on the port by Barbossa and the crew of the notorious Black Pearl changes things a bit, as Ms. Swann is captured and Turner must team up with Sparrow in order to rescue the damsel in distress.  Captain Jack has his own plans, including using the boy and his mysterious gold coin as trade with the pirates, and doublecrossing anyone who crosses his doubly dangerous path.

A near perfect mix of action, comedy, music, and naval dramatics, Black Pearl is the movie that started the franchise, a series that’s still going strong to this day, if losing its magic with every money-grab that’s thrown at theatres.  But the first can’t be denied; I dare you to even try.  I remember seeing this on the big screen when it debuted, and everyone there was completely blown away.  It’s a play on a childhood memory, a great use of talent perfectly suited to roles, and a colossal example of what can go right when you combine movies with music in just the right way.  Depp is iconic as Sparrow, Knightley & Bloom only slightly less so as Elizabeth & Will, and the icing on the cake is Geoffrey Rush as Captain Barbossa, a thrilling performance that should go down as one of the coolest movie villains in history.  I could watch this a hundred times more, its glamour doesn’t diminish, and its entertainment value remains sky high.

My rating: ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

 

 


  • 0

Movie Review – Suite Française

Category : Movie Review

Director: Saul Dibb

Starring: Michelle Williams, Matthias Schoenaerts, Kristin Scott Thomas

Year: 2014

The rise of Matthias Schoenaerts has been something to see, apart from his uniquely handsome, wonderfully Belgian, leading man good looks.  His filmography is beyond impressive: Black Book, Rust and Bone, Blood Ties, The Drop, A Little Chaos, The Loft, Suite Française, Far from the Madding Crowd, Disorder, The Danish Girl, A Bigger Splash.  I don’t think that I’ve gone out of my way to watch his films, but I keep finding him everywhere, and he gets better & better with each role.  He isn’t the lead in this movie, Michelle Williams is, but he demands the attention of the audience, in this and every role, and I’m beginning to understand that he’s not just an actor, but rather a star.

World War II has engulfed France, with the Germans rolling to an easy victory and taking the country as their own territory.  The people of Paris flee to the smaller towns and villages, hoping to put as much distance as possible between themselves and the Nazi occupiers.  But Hitler’s soldiers are everywhere, forcing the entire nation to follow their rules, enforcing martial law over a people who are still their enemy.  Lucile, a young wedded woman whose husband is off fighting the Huns, finds a German officer quartered in the house she shares with her mother-in-law, a well-bred officer who used to be a composer and now sees himself as apart from the common, mindless soldier.  The two fall in love amidst the horrors of war, a relationship that is more than difficult, more than forbidden.

Suite Francaise the novel was written by a Jewish woman during WWII and is considered the earliest fiction based on the war, as it was written during the events it depicted.  The author, Irene Nemirovsky, was killed in Auschwitz in 1942.  Her daughter kept her unpublished works without knowing what they were for fifty years, before discovering them and and releasing the stories.  I think it’s safe to say that the power behind the film adaptation is much stronger than the film itself, which from the very beginning feels weak, recycled, and far too normal.  Williams fails to impress with her narration and British accent, Schoenaerts saving the day on more than one occasion.  The rest of the cast of the movie is filled with names, but is sadly without standout performances: Kristin Scott Thomas, Margot Robbie, Ruth Wilson, Sam Riley.  The music that fuels the love between the leads is pleasant, the WWII background is solid, but nothing ever happens to wow the audience, to make this film anything more than just another romance set against violence.

My rating: ☆ ☆ ☆

 

 


  • 0

Movie Review – Suntan

Category : Movie Review

Director: Argyris Papadimitropoulos

Starring: Makis Papadimitriou, Elli Tringou

Year: 2016

If you’re in the unusual mood for a foreign drama about a doctor’s obsession with his young patient, and you don’t mind that much of the action is set on a nude beach, then you’re in luck.  Suntan is a unique, Greek comedy/unrequited romance/thriller that doesn’t fit inside any shape of box, but rather creates a new set of boundaries that only it can push to the limit.  I use the word ‘boundaries’ lightly, because this film will shock most, will upset quite a few, and definitely isn’t for everyone.  It’s an odd story with absolutely no hero, but with some deeper meaning than just the surface plot that should captivate audiences looking for something a little sinister with their summer vacation flick fun.

Kostis has just come to the island as the tiny town’s doctor, where he will be in charge of the 800 residents during 3/4 of the year, but will need to be on his toes during the hot months, for that’s when the tourists come.  It’s a vacation destination, this island, and its idyllic facade is just that, a cover for the real lives of the people who live their year round.  Kostis gets settled in, but is disturbed by a group of partygoers who bring one of their crew in with an injured leg.  Her name is Anna, and she’s beautiful.  Kostis becomes a sort of mascot for the gang, a portly man twice their age who doesn’t know how to be cool but is eager to learn.  His budding love for Anna will rock the boat though, as will his persistence in joining their fun, whether they want him to or not.

You could say that this movie is a slow burn, but you can feel the spinning out of control coming a mile off, but in a good way, in a way that builds tension until you know that it has got to be released or explode.  Kostis is so out of place, it’s uncomfortable to watch, and it only grows more so as he attends the beaches, goes to the parties, makes a fool out of himself, and begins to think that he’s in love, when what he is really is is over his head.  To touch on the nudity in this film; it’s constant, and at first you notice it, but by the end it’s just young people naked on a beach because why not, it’s not a huge deal anymore.  The violence inherent in some of the sexual aspects of the film will be a bigger problem for some, but try to appreciate the story that this director is trying to tell.  There’s a depth here we don’t often see, and I’m glad I stumbled upon this crafty foreign film, a movie that upsets on purpose.

My rating: ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

 

 


  • 0

Movie Review – Them (2006)

Category : Movie Review

Director: David Moreau

Starring: Olivia Bonamy, Michael Cohen

Year: 2006

I can’t remember when or how, but this movie was recommended to me, and now I’m forced to wonder why.  Basedt in Romania but featuring French as well, it’s a small-time horror flick that won’t appeal to American audiences.  I’m not sure how it appeals to foreign audiences either, but somebody must like it, because it isn’t derided, it’s fairly well-liked.  And I hate to be the voice that says “I don’t get it”, but I don’t get it.  Them is a very simple flashlight thriller without anything else to back the story or the talent to take anything to the next level.  If you’re looking for under-the-radar, look elsewhere, for while your intentions might be good, this movie isn’t.

Clementine is a school teacher who travels outside the city to reach her home and the love of her life, Lucas, a writer who waits for her there.  They are a beautiful couple, full of romance and comfort, but their idyllic existence is about to be shattered.  In the middle of the night, Clementine hears a noise outside, which reveals itself to be someone stealing her car.  After a call to the police, things go from bad to worse; the phones cut out, the power goes off, and strange scurryings are heard around the house.  Soon, some unknown terror is inside, and it’s up to our heroic couple to find out what it is and how to survive the night.

Sounds pretty basic from the description, but it’s actually far worse.  The standard recipe is there at the beginning, but the movie follows none of the Hollywood horror norms.  Now, that might sound like a good thing, and sometimes it definitely is, but not here.  Instead of taking the plot in a new direction, the story goes nowhere at all, and our two main characters spend the majority of the film wondering what that sound or that light was, while stumbling around in a dark house.  Not my idea of fun, and even though the action resolves itself in the end, by then I couldn’t possibly have cared less.  There’s nothing worth watching about this movie, and the fact that it’s only 70 minutes is its only saving grace.

My rating: ☆ ☆

 

 


  • 0

Movie Review – Cars 3

Category : Movie Review

Director: Brian Fee

Starring: Owen Wilson, Cristela Alonzo, Armie Hammer

Year: 2017

One of the most amazingly animated feature films I have ever seen, Cars 3 trails only Inside Out as a combination of perfect visuals and stirring story, stamping its own legend and franchise with a gold seal as Lighting drives off into the sunset.  I’m a fan of the series and I have a young boy, so I’m partial to the characters and my son has more than a few of them in Matchbox form.  It’s a wonderful world of humor and heart, of astonishing anthropomorphization that approaches real genius.  Lighting, Doc, Mater; these cars will live on forever, and I’m aware how dramatic that sounds, but I believe it to be true; this is a trilogy that will stand up over time and that will keep a place of honor in the Disney/Pixar film vault.  What’s more, this third installment is the best yet by far, and has a real shot at taking home Best Animated Feature at this year’s Academy Awards.

Our favorite, cocky racer, Lighting McQueen, is still going strong on the Piston Cup Circuit.  He’s a veteran by now, but still loves the thrill and the speed of the track more than anything, and can’t imagine a day when he might step away.  Well, the decision may not be his to make, because a new crop of rookie racers are hitting the blacktop, and they have skills that Lighting has never seen before.  In comparison, he seems slow and sluggish, an old car who doesn’t know that his best days are behind him.  But Lighting doesn’t know the word ‘quit’, and a new owner creates a facility to help the champ get back up to top speed.  His trainer, Cruz, knows how to motivate competitors, but she may also need some motivation of her own, as she and Lighting travel the South looking for the magic that he may have lost, that he hopes to harness one last time.

Cars was great, Cars 2 was only OK, but Cars 3 is spectacular.  First, they returned to the proven formula of the first film instead of trying more antics like a villain, a sidekick, some action.  This film is a throwback to the simple ideals of this genre, without the added crises and chaos that can so easily feel forced.  Lighting is aging, it’s difficult, he struggles, and in the end hopes to find redemption; that’s basically it.  But that’s enough for me, and I hope that amount of pure heart is enough for you, because this movie scales back when it could overpower, and that’s something worth praising.  Time is taken to develop character, and it’s even a character we already know, so they didn’t have to do that; the fact that they did it anyway means something.  Doc is gone but his memory lingers, Lighting is changing but it’s not necessarily for the worse, and there are still lessons to be learned from this parade of vehicles.

The addition of a female character (other than Sally) is more than welcome, it’s in standing with the current trend in the industry, and count me among the group who couldn’t be happier.  Cruz is Lightning’s shadow, and we learn more from her as the film progresses, understanding that she deserves the spotlight as well.  Cruz isn’t the best character, or done with the best voiceover, but by the end she wins you over, and I guess that’s what counts.  She’s both what makes the movie important and what makes it imperfect, but the enormity of her role can’t be questioned.  Mater is a side piece, which I was happy about, I loved Lightning’s trek around the country, and oh my god, the animation is stupefying.  When the “camera” zooms over the racetracks it takes my breath away, it’s a visual experience you have to see to believe.  We’ll see if they make more movies in this franchise in the future, but they don’t need to; Cars 3 is the cherry on top.

My rating: ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

 

Save

Save

Save


  • 0

Movie Review – Detour

Category : Movie Review

Director: Christopher Smith

Starring: Tye Sheridan, Emory Cohen, Bel Powley

Year: 2016

I was so disappointed in Detour that I’m not even sure how to start reviewing it.  Here was my reaction to the trailer back in November, “I’ve now seen the majority of Tye Sheridan’s movies, too many to list here, and I count myself lucky in that; the kid is one hell of an actor.  I saw him coming with his performance in Mud and he hasn’t slowed down since.  I also really enjoyed Emory Cohen in Brooklyn, so I’m looking forward to what these two young men can do playing off of each other.  As far as the film goes, it’s a smart trailer, makes the movie look exciting, breaks it up enough to pique my interest, but I’ll refrain from saying that the entire project looks amazing; we’ll just have to wait & see”, and I think that shows how much I wanted the film to be good while also feeling a little trepidation that it wouldn’t be.

A young law student and a wealthy kid set for life, Harper’s future is about to take a turn for the worse.  His mother is in a coma, put there after a drunk-driving incident involving his loser of a step-dad.  Harper blames Vincent for the accident, and secretly wishes he could make the bastard pay.  At a local bar, Harper meets Danny, a criminal and a live wire who takes a shine to the kid, or at least appears to.  The pair head to a local strip joint where Harper toys with the idea of having his step-dad bumped off, a conversation he forgets the next day.  But Danny doesn’t, and he appears at Harper’s house, ready to drive him to Vegas to kill his old man, whether Harper has had a change of heart or not.

I wanted this movie to be good, I can’t express that enough, and so I felt insulted when it so blatantly was not.  Sheridan was a bump on a log for most of the film, and I’m shocked that he didn’t do better.  He wasn’t believable, likeable, or captivating in any way, and I need him to recover quickly in his next project.  Cohen was cool, but his character was a stereotypical shell, not something that should be given to such a talented actor.  And the direction, wow, it was a mess.  I hate to use that word, it’s too unspecific, but Chris Smith failed in the experiment he was performing, splitting up the timeline, literally spitting the screen, and generally screwing up an already broken plot even further.  By the end, I couldn’t have cared less who did what, who got away with what, or what the future held from these kids; no one had done a good enough job to earn my interest.

My rating: ☆ ☆

 

 


  • 0

Movie Review – Drive

Category : Movie Review

Director: Nicolas Winding Refn

Starring: Ryan Gosling, Carey Mulligan, Bryan Cranston

Year: 2011

Sometimes it happens; the first time I watched Drive I just didn’t get it.  I was expecting something else, I was watching with the wrong mindset, I was distracted; who knows, but I just didn’t understand the critical positivity, and I simply didn’t like it.  As I’ve grown as a writer and a movie-goer, I’ve learned to appreciate Nicolas Winding Refn and his unique style, making my negative opinion of Drive begin to seem odd, even to myself.  I enjoyed Valhalla Rising and The Neon Demon so much; I knew that I had to rewatch and reexamine the one that got away.  I’m so glad that I did, because this film is so much better than I gave it credit for the first time around.

Our hero is a driver, and he doesn’t supply a name.  What he knows is cars; mechanic, stunts, getaway, whatever it is that you need.  He’s a kid with talent cruising the streets of L.A. with a hot rod for hire, mixing with the low life of the city not because he fits in but because he has nothing better to do.  When he meets Irene, he begins to feel a tug that could get him out of this shadowy existence.  But when the father of her child is released from prison, he brings a criminal element home that only a professional driver has the tools to negotiate with.  He doesn’t do it for the guy, he doesn’t do it for the money, he does it for the girl, and his simple existence is about to get complicated.

NWR is one hell of a director, someone who knows how to mix mood with blood until the consistency is just right.  The L.A. landscape, the fast cars, the lowly mobsters, the inherent violence; you can almost taste the octane of the fuel and the metal of the bullets.  I didn’t appreciate that the first time, I wasn’t ready for the blunt force trauma of the story, but the second time around showed me what I had been missing.  Ryan Gosling is a super-duper star, and he lays it all out there for this film.  He’s backed up amazingly, which helps, and the entire cast comes together to build something special.  Mulligan, Cranston, Albert Brooks, Oscar Isaac, Ron Perlman; there are some career performances on display here.  Prepare yourself before you go in, because this isn’t a movie for everyone.  But open up your cinematic taste buds, welcome something different, and you’ll be rewarded.

My rating: ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

 

 


  • 0

DVD Review – Welcome to Happiness

Category : Movie Review

Director: Oliver Thompson

Starring: Kyle Gallner, Olivia Thirlby, Brendan Sexton III

Year: 2015

Filmmakers have to get their start somewhere, and Oliver Thompson chose Welcome to Happiness.  He directed, wrote, produced, and created the soundtrack for this film, all of which were his first attempts at cinema.  Give the guy some credit for effort and for giving his entire self to a movie he must have believed in, but that doesn’t mean it all worked as planned.  Actually, very little went right, from the casting to the execution, but at least he tried.  Amateur filmmakers rarely stumble upon something golden, and they often need a few films in order to find their way.  Chalk this bad result up to inexperience and move on; perhaps Thompson will have more to give us another day.

The Movie

Woody is a children’s book author with a very unusual side job; he ushers random strangers through his closet into a magical doorway that fixes their lives.  Sounds odd, is odd, but Woody enjoys helping others, and he likes being the manager of something special that brings people such happiness.  He’s never been through the door himself, doesn’t exactly know what’s on the other side, but rests easy knowing that those who show up and pass a simple test proving who they are can walk into a better life in a matter of minutes.  But when Woody meets a girl who he helped and who has returned to our world, he begins to wonder just why he has never been allowed to experience the joy he helps bring to others.

At the same time, many connected story lines are swirling about the town, merging lives into one another until the entire web wraps around the world like a giant security blanket.  Woody dates his beautiful neighbor Trudy and meets her friend Farrah, who only has one hand.  A suicidal man named Nyles makes a timely discover that just might keep him from killing himself.  A pair of orphaned brothers struggle to cope with the deaths of their parents, regardless of the money and comfort that was left behind.  And a strange team of landlord, secretary, and guru weave wacky magic throughout the group until their hearts are full with the knowledge that each life matters in a wonderfully unique way.

This movie makes very little sense, which I have to assume is what the director was going for.  Sure, the plot is resolved in a way, and we do get to see what’s on the other side of the door, but the information given us is more existential and less concrete, keeping absolute fact at a distance.  Fine, it’s a weird indie film, we get it, but I often felt like the director was simply making bits and pieces up as he went along, that nothing was going to come together in a master plan, and it really never did.  There was also some copying going on, which isn’t surprising from an amateur, a bit of John Malkovich and a bit of Royal Tenenbaums, a combination that works on paper but is hard to swallow when it also feels ripped off.

About an hour into the nearly two hour film, I had the exact sensation that I had received all I would from the movie, that I had understood the point and there would be nothing else to gain from watching the rest.  I was right, which left the second half as a bizarre and unnecessary thing that I just couldn’t enjoy.  The main theme, the odd characters; there were parts that worked, but not enough over a long enough period of time.  I didn’t like our hero Woody, I felt that he was poorly developed and executed, and I never believed his relationship with the literal girl next door.  Nick Offerman and Keegan-Michael Key make appearances, but they don’t really bring their unique brands of comedy, and so don’t really add anything to the story.  Overall, Welcome to Happiness is an unskilled attempt to make something cool that simply doesn’t work.

The DVD

Video – With an aspect ratio of 1.85:1 (16×9), the video quality of the film is fairly benign.  More than the actual clarity, I didn’t like the camerawork of the movie; it felt very young and unpolished.  The picture quality is fine for an indie film, but don’t expect more than that.

Audio – The disc is done in English 5.1 Surround, with an option of 2.0 Stereo.  Also, audio commentary from the director, cast, and crew can be accessed in this menu.  The sound quality was as nondescript as the video, with nothing to remember the next day.

Extras – The only special features on the DVD are two deleted scenes (with or without director commentary) and a trailer for the film.

Final Thoughts

Rent It. With a interesting premise and not much else, Welcome to Happiness will be a disappointment for those looking for a hidden gem.  It is far from that, and soon after starting it quickly takes on a specific mood that basically alerts you that the rest of what you are about to see won’t be very strong.  I hate to judge a film too quickly, but you can see the poor quality and development coming as soon as you pop in the DVD, and the movie doesn’t improve given time and a solid chance.  The directing just isn’t there, the actors just aren’t suited to their roles, and the whole project feels under-thought.  The video is basic, the audio uninteresting, and there aren’t many extras on the disc, so look elsewhere for technical marvels.  This movie isn’t terrible, but rather weak, and I hope Thompson can step up his game his next time at bat.

☆ ☆ – Content

☆ ☆ – Video

☆ ☆ – Audio

☆ ☆ – Extras

☆ – Replay

 

 

Save

Save

Save

Save


  • 0

Movie Review – The Red Turtle

Category : Movie Review

Director: Michael Dudok de Wit

Starring: Emmanuel Garijo, Barbara Beretta, Tom Hudson

Year: 2016

Nominated for Best Animated Feature at the 2017 Academy Awards, The Red Turtle marks an unusual pairing of Studio Ghibli and a non-Japanese animator.  Famed director Hayao Miyazaki retired from the company, but was instrumental in creating this film, campaigning to land Michael Dudok de Wit as its co-producer, who would go on to write and direct as well.  The Ghibli magic is on board for this feature, though the result is not typical, if you’ve come to know & love their work.  This time, the story is much more interpretive, much less youthful, and carries a weight around its neck that can drag down those not prepared for the sadness and also the beauty.

An unnamed man is shipwrecked and alone, cast about the waves of the sea like a toy in a tub.  Miraculously, he washes ashore on a small island, a place with nothing except a few native animals, a pool of fresh water, and a bamboo forest.  He survives, but loneliness drives him near insanity, and he knows he must leave that place.  So he builds a raft, with fruit & sails & possibilities, only to have it dashed to pieces by an unknown ocean creature.  He returns to the beach, builds another raft, and tries again, only to have the same outcome repeat itself.  Eventually, in his anger and desperation, the man takes out his rage upon the animal, not knowing that he will release a life force that will change the course of his own future.

The Red Turtle is such an original and wonderful film, an instant, animated classic for adults that kids should be watching instead of Minions, a movie that matters in the way that not many can claim.  Even with none of the characters speaking except for the occasional “Hey!”, the mood was loud & clear, the message perhaps being a bit more subtle and requiring some time to process after watching.  It’s heart-warming, heart-breaking, and constantly emotional, a roller-coaster of peace & peril that we can all recognize as the framework of life.  And the animation is wonderful, the way the shadows are drawn so perfectly, the way the color changes as the sun shifts.  This is a delightful movie, something worth watching if you want something other than the standard Pixar fare.

My rating: ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

 

 


  • 0

Movie Review – Shimmer Lake

Category : Movie Review

Director: Oren Uziel

Starring: Benjamin Walker, Rainn Wilson, John Michael Higgins

Year: 2017

Netflix keeps pumping out the crime/comedy/thrillers, and I don’t see any reason they should stop.  The next level is actual Hollywood-caliber hits, like War Machine or the upcoming Okja or Bright, but for now this genre is supporting itself and each film they pump out of the factory is at least decent.  The problem is, and maybe this is why their next projects include much bigger stars, these toss-away, 90-minute, caper-gone-wrong flicks don’t have high enough ceilings to be anything more than good.  I Don’t Feel at Home, Small Crimes, Handsome; these movies are OK, they’re fine, and they’re doing their job, but they won’t bring the buzz that I’m sure this budding production company would love.  Shimmer Lake is no different, a cool cult-feel comedy that’s enjoyable, but not that memorable.

There has been a bank robbery, and everyone involved in it has either ended up dead or disappeared.  To get to the bottom of this case, we’ll have to travel back in time step by step, recreating the kooky heist one bad decision at a time, until the real culprits are revealed.  Zeke is the sheriff of a sleepy town, one that’s known only one big incident in its recent history, and that case may be exactly the clue that will crack open this one.  Zeke’s brother, Andy, and the local judge, Dawkins, once let a murderer off on simple drug charges.  Now Ed is out of prison, has teamed up with dimwitted Chris, and has devised with Andy a bank robbery, stealing cash from none other than Judge Dawkins.  It’s an insane mix of motives and characters, but we’ll get to the bottom of it, or die trying.

The film is presented backward, with each day playing out in its entirety, but then, at the end, the next scene begins with the previous day.  Make sense?  Watching it is fairly easy, it’s not a head-scratcher like Memento or something, the director just wanted to do something unique.  Well, he did I guess, but it isn’t really worth it.  If the story had been told normally, we would have had a Fargo-style dark comedy, and perhaps then we would have called this film a copy, so maybe it was a lose-lose situation.  As it stands, Shimmer Lake is fun to watch, but not much more than that.  Walker is the straight man, Wilson & Higgins are fine, but it’s the Feds who steal the show, played by Rob Corddry and Ron Livingston, in small parts that make a big impact comedically.  Netflix is pumping out solid features, but I’m still waiting for something more.

My rating: ☆ ☆ ☆