Monthly Archives: May 2018

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Movie Review – The Wailing

Category : Movie Review

Director: Hong-jin Na

Starring: Do-won Kwak, Jung-min Hwang, Hwan-hee Kim

Year: 2016

My critics’ group nominated The Wailing for Best Foreign Language Film of 2016, with audiences here and in South Korea raving about the quirky, twisted, darkly-entertaining mystery, critics and aggregates agreeing that it was a modern masterpiece.  It came out of nowhere, with Na, the director, taking a 6-year break between movies, having only helmed three ever, including this surprise hit.  All signs pointed toward an experience I should be upset that I missed, so I made sure to keep The Wailing on my list, to not let it slip by.  But although I’m glad I watched, I can’t join the throng in singing this film’s praises.  It’s basically a very confusing and very long zombie movie where demon’s do the infecting instead of killer viruses.  I’m all for that strange concoction, but the movie still left me feeling flat, unsure how I should react to something so bizarre.

In the small village of Goksung, South Korea, a series is gruesome deaths shock the community.  The victims are hacked to pieces, the murderers seemingly insane, but the epidemic only continues, with no real root surfacing to explain away the tragedy.  Police officer Jong-goo attempts to follow the trail, as patchy as it is, but this only results in his own daughter contracting the illness; a rash, increased hostility, and soon, violent tendencies.  The signs seem to point to a Japanese man who has recently come to the village, and who is rumored to be in the forest eating the animals, praying to some unknown force.  But when Jong-goo confronts this man, things only get worse, so bad that he hires a shaman to cast out the evil spirits from his daughter and stop the Japanese Man’s wicked ways.

It makes very little sense, even after the climax, even after reading a film summary.  I get what happened, at least the events of what happened, but I still don’t know why, or what, or which now?  The story is all over the place, with evil spirits and mistresses and policemen and priests and daughters and mothers-in-law; if you blink you might miss who is going into the woods to hunt down demons next.  And then there are the genres, so many genres, that this movie touches.  It’s a melodrama, a zombie movie, a horror flick, a comedy at times, a very unique South Korean point of view that’s refreshingly different than Hollywood, that’s for sure, but always an odd assortment of styles that didn’t keep me on my toes as much as it put me off balance.  I would have liked the film more had it been more grounded, more centered, or perhaps if I had been prepared by a friend before sitting down, like “man this is screwed up, just ride it.”  That might have made everything better, so if that warning helps you, then you’re welcome.

My rating: ☆ ☆ ☆

 

 


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Movie Review – The King’s Speech

Category : Movie Review

Director: Tom Hooper

Starring: Colin Firth, Geoffrey Rush, Helena Bonham Carter

Year: 2010

The King’s Speech is a film monument, nominated for twelve Oscars, winning Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Director, and Best Original Screenplay.  It was released on Christmas Day of 2010 with the purpose of being an Academy Award winner, of becoming a movie that portrayed history while making its own.  That plan doesn’t always work, audiences don’t always react the way studios imagine they will, but we couldn’t help love this story and its cast of tremendous actors, a perfect combination that doesn’t come ’round as often as we’d like.  This was director Tom Hooper’s first major picture, and I’d say it was an uncommon success, a spectacular cinematic achievement that deserved its honors then and, fortunately, still holds up now.

King Edward V of England is nearing the end of his life, and he leaves behind two sons; David the Elder and Albert the Stammerer.  Albie has always been known for his stutter, his inability to speak at all on occasion, and this defect has always been seen as a weakest of character, of a sign that he simply isn’t a man who could someday be King.  But King he will be, when he father dies and his brother abdicates the throne, choosing to marry a divorcee, which is strictly forbidden under the Church of England.  So Albert becomes King George VI and Britain enters a war with Germany; now is the time for a monarch to calm and lead his people.  But Albie can’t even speak to them, so he begins to work on his stammer with the help of Lionel Logue, an Australian who specializes in helping those who have lost their voice.  With Lionel’s aid, Albert begins to find the roots of this problem, as well as the courage within himself to become a King.

A multitude of stellar pieces came together to form this terrific film, and that’s what set it above its contemporaries, what afforded it all those awards.  For my money I’d have picked Black Swan or even The Fighter, but The King’s Speech is inarguably deserving, and it’s not hard to see why.  The music is incredible, the costumes are rich, the sets are stupendous, the cinematography is perfect, the flow of the film could not have been better, and the cast is one of the strongest British companies you will see on screen: Firth, Rush, Carter, Derek Jacobi, Jennifer Ehle, David Bamber from Rome, Michael Gambon, Guy Pearce, Timothy Spall.  Pretty impressive, as is the ability to seize this massive moment in history and stage it in such a personal way, to show us a man overcoming his demons while the world prepares to do the same.  This film is already an icon, a feat of arts, and will live on as long as the life-changing events it portrays.

My rating: ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

 

 


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Movie Review – Novitiate

Category : Movie Review

Director: Maggie Betts

Starring: Margaret Qualley, Melissa Leo

Year: 2017

First-time feature director Maggie Betts throws a Hail Mary with her small-scale film Novitiate, but the pass is caught, the prayer is answered, the cliché is complete, because the movie is a no-joke success, a stunning accomplishment that reveals and questions in steady measure, that captures our attention with a simple story that longs to be told.  This isn’t real life for the vast majority of us, but Betts dives into a transformative period for a specific group of people, paints a picture of their lives, and dares us not to judge.  Novitiate is almost an exposé or a documentary, the action seems so real and so realistically unfathomable, a mix of hatred and love that we can all respond to, even if the setting is as strange and uncomfortable as an alien planet.

Cathleen wasn’t raised in the church, but her single mother took her to mass on occasion and even enrolled her in Catholic school, mostly as a way to give her daughter a quality education and to keep her away from the troubled life that no mother wants to pass on to her daughter.  But Cathleen took to the church in a way that her mother never expected, even feeling a calling from God to join a monastery to begin her training to become a nun.  First was the postulant period, then the novitiate, a time for girls to seek the word of God before taking their final vows and promising to never leave the abbey again.  At the same time as Cathleen’s confusing adolescence, the Catholic Church seeks to become more moderate by changing some of their stances, practices, and beliefs.  Many nuns feel abandoned by these new rules, and Cathleen doesn’t understand her place in all this, not hearing God as clearly as she once believed she could.

There are a couple independent segments to discuss when critiquing this film.  One is the nunnery, their history, their silences, their methods, their madness.  At least, that’s the way I look at it; complete and utter madness.  How a person could want this life, could treat others this way, could believe that this is what God is asking them to do, is unfathomable.  Religion is fucked up; that’s the simplest way to put it.  And this film shows that to us in unblinking fashion.  Next is the acting, which is hit and miss, hot and cold, at times wholly supporting the story and at times letting it down completely.  Leo was phenomenal, Qualley was OK, but the rest of the girls and her mother were pretty terrible.  Quinn from Glee made an appearance, and that was weird, but she actually held her own, even if I had a hard time believing her as a Sister.  So the acting was a mixed bag, but I was fascinated by the film itself, and the directing was on point, so the positives strongly outweigh the negatives.  A touch of sexuality, a look at abuse in varying forms, a bold slap in the face to the Church; Novitiate has a lot to offer, especially for an indie film, and it deserves our attention.

My rating: ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

 

 


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Movie Review – Keeping Up with the Joneses

Category : Movie Review

Director: Greg Mottola

Starring: Zach Galifianakis, Isla Fisher, Jon Hamm, Gal Gadot

Year: 2016

The director of Superbad is a cool dude in my book, so I’m more than willing to watch a much more tame, suburban, cookie-cutter comedy if Mottola chooses to helm it, in the hopes that it’ll accidentally be awesome.  Keeping Up with the Joneses will probably never be called that, but for my hour and forty-five minutes, I’m willing to call it solid.  It’s an unoriginal comedy about regular people interacting with hot people and hilarity ensuing; we’ve seen it before and we’ll see it again.  So while nothing in this movie will stick with you the next day, the content it funny enough to carry audiences through for a short while, and sometimes that’s all we need.

Jeff & Karen Gaffney live a quiet, predictable, safe life in the suburbs with their kids, on a cul-de-sac where everyone is friendly and nothing bad (or even exciting) ever happens.  Jeff works for a big company in HR, Karen is an interior designer, they may be a little boring, but they’re also pretty happy.  But things are riled up a bit when a new couple move in next door; the Joneses.  Tim & Natalie are attractive, interesting, attractive, spontaneous, attractive, worldly; they have it all.  Tim warms up to Jeff really fast, and he’s curiously curious about his job, who he talks to, and what they say.  Turns out, the Joneses are actually spies, and, get this, Jones isn’t actually their last name.

Watched expecting nothing more than a simple good time, Keeping Up with the Joneses delivers a few laughs and some mild entertainment.  While that doesn’t sound like (and isn’t) much, it’s something that too many other comedies fail to deliver, so let’s be thankful for what we get.  Galifianakis cracks me up, Fisher is funny, Hamm is a good actor, and Gadot is fine, though it’s obvious having watched Wonder Woman that she can do so much better, that she was only cast for her looks.  Speaking of, this movie is surprisingly sexy if you like looking at Fisher and/or Gadot in minimal clothing, so keep that in mind.  The story is silly, the end is predictable, but you weren’t anticipating anything more anyway, so sit back and enjoy just because; you could do worse.

My rating: ☆ ☆ ☆

 

 


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Movie Review – Disobedience

Category : Movie Review

Director: Sebastian Lelio

Starring: Rachel McAdams, Rachel Weisz, Alessandro Nivola

Year: 2017

An early favorite to provide a Best Actress and/or a Best Supporting Actress nomination for next year’s Oscars, Disobedience is the kind of drama that the Academy loves, and for good reason.  I know that audiences can become exhausted from too many sad, heavy, dark, emotionally draining tragedies/romances/melodramas, but they’re often the easiest vehicles to convey the amount of emotion necessary to really pull our hearts into a story.  This film could be up for Best Picture or could send both leading women to the stage to pick up awards; I don’t think that the weight of the main theme should be held against it.  And I even say that not having loved the movie, I simply think it’s deserving of praise and recognition, even if we have become slightly tired of the top features of the year coming to us from such a deep place.  Disobedience is somewhat draining, imperfect in its delivery, but inarguably important and captivating, something we’ll still be hearing about this winter.

A Jewish community in London is rocked when their beloved Rabbi Krushka dies while delivering a sermon, advanced age and pneumonia taking him to be with HaShem before his congregation was ready to let him go.  Taking over will be young  Dovid Kuperman, who has been the Rav’s disciple for years.  When he was a child, Dovid’s best friends were Krushka’s daughter Ronit and a girl named Esti, who is now his wife.  Ronit was shunned my the community and went to live in New York many years ago, after she and Esti had a sexual relationship, something that Dovid was purposed with keeping away from Esti, allowing her to live a honorable and devoted life as a Jewish woman.  Ronit returns to England for the funeral, where she and Esti can’t help but feel the rekindling of their love for each other, despite what being together would mean and what it would destroy.

A film can be good but flawed, which I think describes Disobedience well.  I understand that calling a movie “flawed” may seem like a cop out, since every one is, it doesn’t take much effort to say that something isn’t the best you’ve ever seen.  But this film has specific flaws that keep it from greatness, despite the strengths that still make it worth your time.  The pace is slow, which isn’t always a bad thing, but it is when the filmmaker could have saved our time by utilizing some simple editing, by trimming off the fat that we didn’t need at all, by consolidating scenes so that they each viewed better and the entire project flowed more quickly.  Boredom is a risk when dealing with a topic that’s as dramatic as this one; someone needed to take this movie in a firm hand to hold it back from becoming slow when its content started dragging along the path.  Also, while McAdams has come miles from where she started, she still isn’t an upper echelon actress, while Weisz is, so the discord there distracted me throughout, one woman commanding every scene while the other seemed constantly to only be playing a well-written part.

Weisz is probably the best aspect of Disobedience, her performance containing a ton of anger and bitterness and somehow hope, a complicated persona that was fun to watch.  She and McAdams, the Rachels, worked well together, I thought they had good chemistry, although when their chemistry exhibited itself was a little confusing; I often disagreed with the director on when the moment was right to stun audiences with sex, when to have the women connect emotionally, even when to move to the next stage of the plot.  The story itself is solid; we need to see more insight into religion like this so that more of us can learn its darker secrets, its medieval practices, its inherent ridiculousness.  That won’t be what everyone takes away from the film, but that’s what hit me, how a culture that still clings to an ancient text that has no relevance to their lives can continue, for tradition’s sake, the daily, close-minded idiocy that causes much more harm than it does good.  So the story is necessary, the acting is mostly strong, but the film views longer than it actually is, and a few tweaks would have gone a long way, would have made this contender into a real threat.

My rating: ☆ ☆ ☆

 

 


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Movie Review – The Salesman

Category : Movie Review

Director: Asghar Farhadi

Starring: Shahab Hosseini, Taraneh Alidoosti

Year: 2016

This Iranian film won the Academy Award in 2017 for Best Foreign Feature, and it was well-deserved.  I would have gone with A Man Called Ove if I had a vote, but it was a strong year for the category, although it’s a bit ridiculous that only five movies from the entire non-English-speaking world get to compete for the award.  The Oscars are a bit more pointless than I would have believed when I was younger, but that doesn’t mean that we can’t enjoy them, or that the films that win shouldn’t be given their due respect.  This movie won because it is powerful and well-made, a slow-burning drama that will kick you in the teeth at the end.

Emad and Rana are a married couple living in Tehran; he’s a teacher and she stays at home.  They also both participate in a theatre which is currently putting on The Death of a Salesman, under a bit of censure from the government, but that’s to be expected.  When nearby construction damages their apartment building, the couple is forced to temporarily relocate, searching the city for a likely apartment.  A man from their troupe gets them into a vacant space, but the previous tenant was a woman of ill repute, something he doesn’t share with his prospective renters.  One evening, a man comes to call, not knowing that the woman he expects to find has moved.  He strikes Rana over the head and flees, setting off a series of events that will destroy her & Emad’s happiness, and will propel him toward revenge.

The Salesman really is the definition of a slow burn, the only real action coming off screen when Rana is attacked.  The story takes its time to develop, the situation slowly boils, and, like the frog in the parable, we don’t jump out because we don’t at first notice what’s happening.  Once we do, we’re in deep, and the plot has hooked us.  By the end, which is incredible, we’ve become invested in the characters, and their life is so realistic that it’s hard to separate fact from fiction.  Farhadi is a very respected director, and this film show’s why; he was almost a conductor of an orchestra, slowly building to a climax, more than a filmmaker using standard tricks.  I don’t exactly understand the parallels between what was happening and the show the characters were putting on; I’ve read the screenplay, but I don’t remember enough about it to make the metaphoric connections.  If you do, maybe you’ll pick up on even more, but the story is intense enough without anything extra.  The actors were great, the tension mounts bit by bit, by the end I was enmeshed, and the payoff is worth the work it takes to watch two hours of subtitled angst.  Take a chance on this one if this isn’t your genre but you’re curious; it’s a well-made film all around.

My rating: ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

 

 


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Movie Review – The Brothers Grimm

Category : Movie Review

Director: Terry Gilliam

Starring: Heath Ledger, Matt Damon, Lena Headey

Year: 2005

I’ll always adore Terry Gilliam’s work; there is exactly no one who makes movies the wacky way he does.  You can spot his style a mile away, and that’s a good thing, especially in a world of standard films and cutout recipes; Gilliam has a genre all his own.  His older stuff is his best: Holy Grail, Time Bandits, Brazil, The Fisher King, Twelve Monkeys.  But I find his newer stuff a little weird: Fear and Loathing, The Brothers Grimm, The Zero Theorem.  I know, I know, weird is what he does, what he is, and I can love it, but sometimes I can also think it goes too far.  There’s no forgetting his Monty Python work, it looks like Don Quixote might finally, actually become a movie, so the man’s a legend, there’s no arguing that.  But here with Grimm you’ll see some of his lesser work, and you’ll wonder why this movie was ever made.

The Brothers Grimm, who we know as great storytellers, had more modest beginnings and also more sketchy claims to fame.  In this version of their fictional history, the brothers are con men, duping villagers out of their coins by providing ghosts & witches and then defeating them.  They are known throughout Germany for their exploits, but every single one is a farce, a concoction to make themselves rich.  To be fair, elder Will is the evil genius behind the operation, younger Jake simply goes with the flow.  But their luck is about to change for the worse when they are called upon to get rid of an actual poltergeist in a black forest, a wicked force that’s been stealing children for an unholy purpose.

Other than being one of Heath Ledger’s final roles, there is absolutely nothing special about The Brothers Grimm.  Well, I should say that it stills smacks of Gilliam, his style is dumped over every scene, so that’s special in a way, but he needn’t even have made this film, he could have put his talents to better use on a different project.  The old fairy tales pop up all over the place, they’re all retold, it’s clever, but it really isn’t that interesting, and I’m not sure who thought that audiences would flock to see this story.  The stars are there, that’s for sure, but not even the biggest names do very much to produce more than a yawn: Ledger, Damon, Heady, Monica Bellucci, Jonathan Pryce, Peter Stormare.  The accents are silly, the monsters are silly, the plot is silly, the costumes are silly; it’s like Gilliam ran out of original ideas but decided to go ahead with the movie anyway.  It’s not so awful, it’s just not worth much, and you’d be better served watching something else.

My rating: ☆ ☆

 

 


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Movie Review – The 40-Year-Old Virgin

Category : Movie Review

Director: Judd Apatow

Starring: Steve Carell, Catherine Keener

Year: 2005

I think it’s fair to call The 40-Year-Old Virgin a comedic pillar; it’s obviously not everyone’s favorite movie, but it helped launch Steve Carell’s career and it put Judd Apatow on the map.  Also, it’s simply memorable, a comedy that represents an era, like American Pie or Meet the Parents.  Again, not everyone’s cup of tea, and the content alone will push some audiences away, but raunchy coming-of-age tales are here to stay, whether their characters find themselves in their teens, 20s, 30s, or, in this case, their 40s.  This movie really is a prototype of the genre, just from a different perspective, and with a lead actor who is obviously talented enough to put the entire thing on his shoulders when it’s called for.

Andy lives alone, collects action figures, plays video games, works at an electronics store, never learned how to drive, has no friends, and kinda seems like a serial killer.  Oh, and he’s also a virgin who has never visited any base and has recently turned 40.  Sex has always been on his mind, obviously, but over the years it’s become a bigger and bigger issue, something that he doesn’t want to define him but which he can’t escape.  When the guys at the store find out he’s a virgin, they offer to help, but their “help” is just confusing and stupid and downright wrong.  But then Andy meets Trish, a woman who owns a store across the street, and they fall for each other hard.  The only problem is, can he tell her about his status, will it frighten her away, and will he be up for the task once it’s finally the right time?

Obviously sex is a major player in this film, almost like American Pie, but for adults.  The club scene, speed dating, prostitutes, drunk chicks, porn; it’s all there, so don’t be shocked, and don’t watch this with your mom.  Also, I’ve seen the unrated version; don’t watch that either.  It’s just badly edited and makes for a much less enjoyable film experience, because beyond the stupid sex comedy element, the movie itself is pretty good and deserves regular cinematic attention.  I’m not saying it changed my life, but it’s funny and well-made, so hats off to all involved.  Carell is a natural, he makes it all work, and his character is just so pathetically lovable, he can’t help but root for him.  And the supporting cast is strong: Paul Rudd, Romany Malco, Seth Rogen, Elizabeth Banks, Leslie Mann, Jane Lynch, Kat Dennings, Jonah Hill.  The 40-Year-Old Virgin is a must-see comedy for its impact and for what it does right, but the ceiling was built fairly low, so don’t expect to love it or to run out and buy the DVD.  It’s still silly and juvenile and perverted, it’s just also amusing because of those things, so enjoy the movie for what it is.

My rating: ☆ ☆ ☆

 

 


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Movie Review – Atonement

Category : Movie Review

Director: Joe Wright

Starring: James McAvoy, Keira Knightley, Saoirse Ronan

Year: 2007

I watched the film when it was released, read the book because I wanted more, reread the book years later, and then rewatched the film.  The story is great each time and I wouldn’t hesitate to return to it again and again over the coming years.  The novel is a great read, I highly recommend it, and the movie does it justice in every way.  I think, because the book relied so heavily on words, the movie was able to turn that into mood and not have to cram a ton of action into 120 minutes.  Joe Wright took the plot, gave us each feeling individually, and did the original content justice.  He’s now a semi-household name in the biz, and so are many members of his cast, but who knows what would have happened had they got it all wrong here.  Spoiler; they didn’t, each one held their own, and the team adapted a wonderful book into a spectacular film, one that I thoroughly enjoy.

The story is presented in three acts, with a postscript to tie up the details.  All are excellent, but it’s the first part that sets the stage and the tone, that really feeds us the meat.  The Tallis family live on a beautiful estate in England without a care in the world.  Or at least, they did, before Hitler and his talk of war, but even that is somewhere in the near future, not in the present, which is a hot summer in the country.  Father is at work in the city, Mother is resting with one of her migraines, Leon, the eldest brother, is on his way home, Cecilia, the sister, is back from school, and Briony, the baby, is writing a play for the occasion.  Three cousins are come to stay pending their parents’ divorce, so the house is quite crowded and chaotic.  Briony happens upon three moments between Cecelia and Robbie, a young man whose mother is a servant, that will change the course of all their lives: an exchange by the fountain, a passed note, and a meeting in the library.  Briony’s childish assumptions surrounding these events will lead her to accuse Robbie of a crime later in the evening, sending all of their futures into a downward spiral that there is absolutely no stopping.

Atonement was nominated for seven Oscars, winning Best Original Score, and they were all deserved.  It’s an epic romance set somehow on a grand scale and also on a very small one, with tiny moments that defined larger ones, each weaving in and out with a precision that takes real talent.  Wright is an excellent director, and the best decision he made was to trust the story, to keep to the book, to not fix what wasn’t broken.  And then there’s his cast: McAvoy with a solid performance, Knightley who’s so emotional, Ronan in an early role.  You’ll also notice Juno Temple and Benedict Cumberbatch as small but important characters, so there were stars scattered all over this film.  The music is incredible, composer Dario Marianelli doing an incredible job with the score, really setting the tone for the action and for the deep sadness behind the true history of the moment.  This film is a period piece, a romance, a war tale, and a fictional apology letter, something so complicated that it takes your breath away, while also being so magical that you can’t help but fall in love.

My rating: ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

 

 


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Book Review – Atonement

Category : Book Review

Author: Ian McEwan

Year: 2001

I committed the cardinal sin when it comes to Atonement; I saw the movie before reading the book.  But, in my defense, it was an Oscar-nominated movie, and I did go back and read the book after the fact.  This is actually my second time reading the novel; it was that good the first time around.  It’s one of those rare stories that was captured brilliantly by the film, most likely because it’s not too laden with action, relies heavily on the words, and so filmmakers don’t have to stuff it all into 90 minutes in the editing room.  It somehow works as wordy introspection in book-form and as quick simplicity in movie-form; maybe that just shows how great McEwan did with the writing, it doesn’t matter how you absorb this plot, it’s simply excellent it whatever form.

The story is presented in three acts, with a postscript to tie up the details.  All are excellent, but it’s the first part that sets the stage and the tone, that really feeds us the meat.  The Tallis family live on a beautiful estate in England without a care in the world.  Or at least, they did, before Hitler and his talk of war, but even that is somewhere in the near future, not in the present, which is a hot summer in the country.  Father is at work in the city, Mother is resting with one of her migraines, Leon, the eldest brother, is on his way home, Cecilia, the sister, is back from school, and Briony, the baby, is writing a play for the occasion.  Three cousins are come to stay pending their parents’ divorce, so the house is quite crowded and chaotic.  Briony happens upon three moments between Cecelia and Robbie, a young man whose mother is a servant, that will change the course of all their lives: an exchange by the fountain, a passed note, and a meeting in the library.  Briony’s childish assumptions surrounding these events will lead her to accuse Robbie of a crime later in the evening, sending all of their futures into a downward spiral that there is absolutely no stopping.

So part one is the introduction, but it’s about half the book, and contains most of the action.  Part two is focused on Robbie, part three is Briony grown a bit, and the postscript settles all accounts.  It’s a phenomenally written book, if a bit long-winded and British, if that makes sense, a sweeping melodrama about love and guilt and regret that isn’t exactly easy to read.  But it is beautiful to experience, there is so much more worth that work written here, so much to enjoy despite the melancholy.  Briony is a great character, Robbie allows us to see Dunkirk from an interesting angle, the end will make you weep bitterly when the author reveals the final truths of what happened that night in the country, and what has been ruined by it since.  Read with confidence, especially if you like this period, because you will feel transported there, even though the novel was written in modern times.  And check out the film as well, which is a strong representation of a stellar book.

My rating: ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆